Tag Archives: Photography

OF SWIMSUITS, FRIED EGGS, AND GOOSEBUMPS…

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Monika braves the dead of winter for her art: one or two goose bumps evident, but not a fried egg in sight.

 

Photographers have it easy these days, especially here in Australia, don’t they?

Just rock on down to the nearest beach, model in tow, and bob’s your uncle: sun and surf, pristine beaches, sparkling seas, glistening sands, and sensationally, sexy sirens  all for the taking.

Bang off a few snaps and magazine covers, exceptional portfolios, and international awards are at your fingertips.

As one marketing monkey put it: beautiful one day, perfect the next!

Or maybe not.

While amateurs, wannabes, and fauxpros fight with searing temperatures, teeming crowds of backpackers, and shadows which would put a panda bear to shame, more seasoned shooters avoid the Australian summer and schedule the majority of swimwear and beach shoots for the more gentle light, milder weather conditions and almost deserted locations at the very beginning of spring, and during the crisp, haze free days of the autumn months.

Which brings me to today.

Shoot with a beautiful bikini babe scheduled well ahead: babe ready, bikinis ready, batteries ready.

Weather forecast checked several times over the past week or so: sunny, pleasant temperatures, chance of rain 10% falling to 2% as the afternoon went on.

It’s a go!

Woke up this morning: raining, cold enough to freeze the tail off a tadpole, windy enough to blow the prawns out of their shells, and beaches closed to due enormous seas and dangerous swells.

Frustration strikes again!

Well what to do, but stand around all day and scratch my bum.

Well at least we are more civilized now than in the past…the ‘pre- digital’ age, when due to film processing times, and long magazine lead times, all swimsuit shoots…well if you wanted nice , sparkling seas and blue skies, and fantastically great pics for summer magazine covers,… took place in mid winter when the model slipped off her parka, her ugg boots, and balaclava, just long enough to smile in her string bikini before she froze her tits off, and the photographer’s finger froze onto the shutter button.

Those were the days when men were men, and photographers and models deserved awards.

Ah well, I’ve scratched my bum, nothing else to do but roll over and go back to sleep.

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Part Two: The Artist – Diamond amid the sewage

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Abbey Lee braves appearing in a mock up photograph which contains every possible rookie mistake, poor photography technique, awkward and cliché posing, and just downright bad taste, we could come up with, to show up the constant flow of photographs uploaded to the internet on a daily basis, which are almost identical to this in so many aspects, masquerading as ‘art’, created by legions of self proclaimed, and (almost always) ‘international award winning’ photographers, and invariably rewarded by comments of ‘awesome capture’, ‘inspired’, and even ‘you should become a professional’

After careful reading and attention to accepted definitions given in Part One of this blog: “Are You Really Creative?” it seems evident that self proclaimed ‘artists’ are coming from the wrong end of the creativity spectrum.

In this Anti-Intellectual era we are now so blessed to be living in, the time honoured tradition of ‘artists’ only being drawn from the most accomplished, technically expert, and imaginative, with something profound or at least meaningful to express, has been well and truly abandoned in favour of the naive tyro, who not only has little to no experience, but actively shuns the development of required expertise, technical ability, and problem solving skills, in order that ‘creativity’ and the ‘artist’s integrity’ and ‘passion’ should not be corrupted.

The oft heard mantra: “I will succeed because photography is my Passion!” is indeed the cry of the times, no matter how fanciful or delusional it may be.

Armed then, with apparently nothing but their passion, and faith in their own mostly delusional raw talent, most have not, and many will probably never have the talent, ability, motivation, or originality of thought to get anywhere other than demoralising oblivion…and those few who do have the imagination and something original and inspiring to offer, or say to the world, have not the tools, the training, the experience or the knowledge of how to communicate their ideas and vision effectively.

In other words, their own naive attitudes towards creativity and their undeveloped concept of art, actually conspire against them ever acquiring the requisite skills.

Including:

  • Societally induced expectations of reward without work, inability to accept responsibility for one’s own actions or lack thereof, an over-arching belief that the world ‘owes me’, and the nanny state will protect and look after me, a general lack of inquisitiveness, and the desire for instant reward and gratification

  • Lack of effective and properly structured learning opportunities, in which education is increasingly becoming a world of underfunding and poorly trained and lower quality educators, including a preponderance of mickey mouse courses, the blind leading the blind, (or as some would say in more recent vernacular, the blonde leading the blind) style of internet instruction, and the piece-meal approach to learning advanced techniques, without first mastering the required basics

  • Coupled with this are two further aspects: a) so called ‘professional’ courses are increasingly becoming more a way to get people off welfare, rather than preparing them in any useful way for a career, and b) the vast majority of photography courses, excluding a very few high end ones, are not preparing potential professionals for the rigours of a very demanding and shrinking industry, but actually through choice of method and subject matter, and lack of teaching the very important skills of running and effectively promoting a viable business, are simply affirming amateurism.

  • The reliance on long outmoded preconceived fantasy ideas of the role of the artist, which are now actually being heavily promoted by the increasing ultra conservatism

  • The narcissistic delusion of greatness beyond ability, due to the indiscriminate sycophantic adulation of anything and everything posted on social media pages.

  • The rapid demise of former ‘arbitrators of worthiness’ such as print publications, competitive exhibitions and salons, rights managed stock libraries, and their replacement with pay to play vanity publishing; rights grab competitions; accept anything, especially the lowest common denominator micro-stock agencies; and encouragement to self market and self promote, or talk up how great, creative, wonderful, and otherwise talented you are, rather than letting your work show your real abilities.

  • The preponderance of the miracle work of ‘fix it in Photoshop’, where the best of a bad lot, sometimes numbering in the hundreds of attempts, can be readily salvaged and made great by simply, and usually ineptly, applying Photoshop manipulation, or even the complete reliance on ubiquitous, tacky, over saturated and generally over-processed ‘filters’ and ‘presets’, which supposedly turn even the most unbelievably ‘average’ snap into an instant work of art.

It seems that many would be artists have a very naive, immature and uninformed view of creativity, which hasn’t developed beyond the kindergarten level when Miss Prissy set out the poster paints, and suggested that: “we will all be creative today”.

Unfortunately many don’t recognise that there is and always will be a vast difference between having the wonder of a child, and a strong belief in the fantastic: and living, or trying to make a living completely deluded in a fantasy world.

One would think that all that time cloistered in their respective garrets suffering for their art, they would have plenty of time to check out a book or two, thumb through their camera manual, brush up on a little technique, but apparently not.

Imagine what your house would look like if the carpenter or bricklayer relied on nothing but his childhood skill with Lego bricks to do his job; the accountant who relied on his Year One ‘sums’; the architect who designed buildings with two roof-line windows, a door, a tree and a dog in the yard to match his primary school artwork. And the fate of the preschool minded brain surgeon doesn’t bear thinking about!

So why is the artist obsessed with practising his creativity, but abandoning all he has learned between now and then, convinced that he is not merely an artist, but worthy of being a paid professional salary, by relying on some mystical innate ‘inspiration’, divine providence and the results of simply by buying a paintbrush and canvas, a camera, a hammer and chisel, or any of the tools required by the various arts, and believes his first play sessions with them will produce nothing but masterpieces?

The age old Hollywood quip claims it takes twenty years to become an overnight success, but does it really?

Experience and serious study of successful artists from the past would seem to suggest it takes something more akin to a lifetime, filled not with simply practising the art-form, but acquiring knowledge, inquisitiveness and appreciation of all aspects of the world, vast life and love experience, serious study as well as careful observation, as maybe even a healthy does of the perhaps more flippant ‘life is just a bowl of cherries’ aspects as well.

The starving artist slaving away in his garret, for little or no recompense, and nothing but recognition by facebook friends, has always been a total myth, part of the false romance of the artist more or less promoted by those without any artistic talent whatsoever, or who have wished to portray the arts and artists as ‘ne’r do wells’, as a waste of space, or contemporaneously, a ‘lifestyle choice’ for the unemployables, and a ‘drain on the economy’.

So why the hell are contemporary artists not only falling for this guff, but actually promoting it, especially by accepting piteous pennies for work they do, working for free, pretending sanctimony by offering their work under ‘creative commons’ type exploitation, actively undercutting prices of real artists, churning out ‘masterpieces’ and ‘awesome images’ which in reality are little more than learning exercises, or worse still, should have been binned as a total failure, or an omen of talentless incompetence?

A Picasso, a Pollack, or any number of artists from the last 100 years, may look childlike, even childish on the surface, and inspire insipid phrases such as surely little Jimmy could that, even I could do better…it seems however that every little Jimmy nowadays is giving it a go, to an avalanche of cries of ‘awesome’, ‘inspired work’, and a ‘Like’ thumbs up.

With total disregard of the fact that it takes many years of hard work to achieve such childlike simplicity, and awe of wonder.

As model photography is the go to genre of wannabe photographic artists, it is no wonder that the cliché phrase ‘anybody can take great picture of beautiful woman’ springs to mind.

But can they? A quick scan of facebook ‘internationally award winning, published, professional photographers’ will soon show the opposite to be more likely…that it is incredibly easy to make a good looking girl look downright ugly.

Who hasn’t heard the bleating of amateur photographers whenever they gather in whining herds of more than two: Don’t use her as a model; she’s no good; her tits aren’t big enough; she’s got a belly on her; she might be good looking but a she’s a real bitch. And so they refuse to photograph anybody at all, holding out for the perfect model who will never come their way due to their attitude, and their uncanny ability to make the perfect look less than attractive.

Then there is the group who go other way, and accept all and sundry as camera fodder, with promises of “stick with me honey and I’ll make you a star”: hence the parade of gross snapshots of less than average girls with broken teeth, lifeless eyes, dull, unwashed hair, hideously coloured and shaped false nails, orange suntans, wall to wall tattoos, and all the wonderful, and exclusively amateur fantasies built around total misunderstanding of terms such as ‘plus size’ and ‘alternative modelling’.

But it takes an artist with an accumulation of knowledge, technique, problem solving ability, understanding of human psychology, a real affinity with people, and experience to make an average, less than confident, or a girl of low self esteem into a stunning photograph…that is what creativity is all about.

No its not making a silk purse out of a sows ear…that is just as impossible as making an artist out of a person who has owned his camera for no more than a day or two…it is merely using all the required skills of a true photographer (artist if you wish to stick with that pretentious, overused term) to draw the best from their subject.

As far from a first attempt snapshot as you can get, and it certainly doesn’t happen overnight, if at all. Even more-so, for those who rely on nothing but unsubstantiated faith in themselves, and blind ‘passion’.

©Copyright: Stephen Bennett, MMXVII

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Micro-stock Misadventures

Recently Pond5, a micro-stock agency, successful in the past due to good luck, and good contributors, and despite naive and chaotic management, engaged a new policy, beginning an apparent nosedive towards the gutter, leaving all its competitors in the race to bottom of the micro-stock murk in its wake, and long time contributors in a state of bewilderment.

In light of this, I have been working on a couple of blog posts relevant to the micro-stock industry, exploring the ideas:

  • that it is not, and never has been a place for professional photography, but absolutely set up for the exploitation of know-nothing fauxpros, and star struck amateurs:

  • that its overall premise and ever varying, snake oil salesman like business model is essentially flawed and destructive…to the overall photography market, the image and reputation of photography, and to both the contributors, and buyers through the ever decreasing cost of images.

  • worse still, and either micro-stock management either doesn’t realise, or more likely doesn’t care, the business model is actually self destructive, evidenced through the complete closure of micro-stock agencies, (falling like flies of late,) where once failing agencies were bought out instead by those higher up the food chain.

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These circumstances, as with virtually anything that happens or is announced in the micro-stock industry has led inevitably to the latest round of looneys running round like chooks with their heads cut off wanting to form micro-stock agencies of their own, using of course the same business model, and a choice of being headed by a soon to be sociopathic autocrat, or by an unwieldy ‘cooperative’.

And the first port of call they make for information on how to make it succeed? The renowned home of misinformation, stupidity and trolling: the Internet forums of course!

Strange thing is these are more or less the same people who were not so long ago pleading with the same forums about having 5 billion holiday snaps, how do I go about selling them?

The same ones who show no evidence of having any idea of marketing, licensing images, or even of having anything more to do with photography than a Facebook page or a flickr account, and their only idea of necessary paperwork is from the intentionally confusing ‘misleading conduct’ of the micro-stock agencies themselves with their intentional conservatism and misinformation in regard to model and property releases, copyright, and contracts in general.

And of course they follow the currently in vogue, and really idiotic doctrine of “build it and they will come”, never even hinting for any information about how to attract customers, or buyers to their new, essentially ‘zombie’ business idea.

As the writers of The Copyright Zone website say in their disclaimer: ‘As Jack and Ed like to say, if you woke up with a big, oozing green growth on your neck, would you consult strangers on a website? Hopefully, you’d call a doctor. And if someone needs a professional photograph, don’t you think they should contact a professional photographer and not your Uncle Fred’s mechanic’s neighbour’s brother-in-law?”

Until I research more fully, and write these promised blogs, this article, written by Edward Greenberg and Jack Reznicki (The Copyright Zone) is a great article to be going on with…http://thecopyrightzone.com/?p=1626

Illustration from Pinterest

©Copyright: Stephen Bennett, MMXVI

Except as permitted by the copyright law applicable to you, you may not reproduce or communicate any of the content on this website, including any photographs and files down-loadable from this website, without the permission of the copyright owner.

The Australian Copyright Act allows certain uses of content on the internet without the copyright owner’s permission. This includes uses by educational institutions for educational purposes, and by Commonwealth and State government departments for government purposes, provided fair payment is made. For more information, see www.copyright.com.au and www.copyright.org.au.

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‘Welcome to the Planet of the Seven Suns, Captain Kirk.’

moon doll

I hope my wife isn’t reading this, for from where I sit to write, I can clearly see two framed photographs, prized because they show studio portraits of daughter, her husband and smiling grand-kids.

My problem with both these pictures however, is in a standard group portraiture set up such as this where a key light, a carefully placed shadowless fill, and maybe a rim light to separate the subjects from the background would have done the job not only adequately but quite competently, and have been aesthetically pleasing, that they also rather disconcertingly show not one, not even two, but seven distinct sets of hard edged shadows of even intensity from random, and to quote Mr Spock, illogical directions around the compass.

While the stark white background, and the outlines of the figures are completely blown out to give the illusion of a ghostly glow, the ‘photographer’, no doubt being a consummate professional, has obviously ‘fixed it in photoshop’ so that the identities of each individual can be made out through the gloomy, shadowy darkness of the almost totally unlit camera side of the subjects, and the resulting clods of digital noise resulting therefrom.

But maybe this particular ‘photographer’ followed the thinking that if it doesn’t quite look right yet, let’s add another light.

Or alternatively; I know I am totally incompetent, and this is a horrible mess I am creating, but at least I will impress these yobbos with the amount of expensive gear I have, and if I convert the photos to black and white, I can bullshit that I am a “creative artist”.

The viewing public has now become accustomed to the presence of multiple shadows, through the daily consumption of:

  • three point lighting schemes necessary to TV sitcoms and soap operas;

  • staging of music concerts, in which the presence of a multiple lightshow is so often used to disguise a lack of substance or musical talent

  • poor, unthinking photoshop compositing;

  • and the ubiquitous built in camera flash, which is used almost exclusively in the modern Gothic Horror genre known as ‘selfies’, as well as amateur and fauxpro ‘portraiture’.

Apparently the popular alternative to multi shadow lighting, amongst the fauxpro ranks at least, is ‘porn lighting’, which is completely shadowless, obliterating all form and modelling, giving more or less attractive models flat round featureless moon faces, and clothing the look of paper cut-outs affixed to cardboard dolls.

(Porn lighting was discussed recently in my blog entitled: Lip Service ? Or it Just Sux?)

It need not be said that his style of lighting is the worst imaginable, but is increasingly appearing in what fauxpros try to convince themselves is their ‘awesome’ attempt at ‘fashion’ photography, but is also found, and is equally unwelcome in glamour, makeover shots, and yes, you are way ahead of me, in ‘portraiture’ (?)

But with this daily exposure to a virtual galaxy of visual stimuli, with apparently naturally occurring and yet physically impossible lighting; coupled with an overwhelming amount of meaningless, uninspired, poorly conceived, exposed and processed crud masquerading as ‘professional’ photography, are we in danger of actually creating an alien culture of visual illiteracy?

The ramifications of this photo-diarrhoea overload may seem minor, and many may claim that I am simply being alarmist based on a petty non-issue, but when considered with the highly selective, edited, and manipulated pictures and video passed off as ‘factual’ in the mainstream press and television news and current affairs, not to mention the increasingly indiscriminate belief in online sources, ranging from the highly suspect to the downright fabrications of the so called ‘satire’ sites, there should at least be a worry.

Yes m’dear, naive Ensign Rand, don’t let it worry your pretty little head but, the camera always lies!

“…Aye Cap’ain she gonna blow any minute noo.”

The following illustration is a shadow map of an image picked at random from the daily spew of ‘awesome images’ that sully the pages of facebook. I should add that it was taken by a self proclaimed ‘facebook professional’ photographer with an ample following of fawning sycophants.

shadow map

(Derived under fair use provisions of the Copyright Act allowing exceptions for education, criticism or review)

To state the bleedin’ obvious…it is an ‘original artwork’, or to quote one of the sycophantic comments, ‘an inspired concept”, reminiscent of the century old, and done to death cliché of the ‘happy sailor glamour girl in the rigging’.

Who knows, in this funny old world of contemporary photography, maybe a copy from an inspiration of a theme from a copy of a derivative work based on a ‘mood board’ was used as the original (?) ‘inspo’.

The theme and composition seem to provoke little thought beyond ‘disembodied head next to ropes against a white background’.

Needless to say while there is a very distinct and no doubt ‘creative’ shadow of the ropes on the background, there is absolutely no corresponding shadow of the figure to match. Look closely and you will notice an extremely soft shadow of the girl, confusingly on the opposite, and seemingly impossible side of her.

And yet once you have seen this strange anomaly, you sense that there is still something not quite right, until you realise that the dominant light source projects shadows to the right, but the shadows on the face of the figure fall oddly to the left.

But needless to say the inspiring artwork still got more than it’s fair share of ‘great lighting’, ‘beautifully creative’ and ‘awesome capture’ comments.

In conclusion, to boldly stretch the Star Trek allusion beyond where no man has gone before:

“It’s photography Jim, but not as we know it!”

©Copyright: Stephen Bennett, MMXVI

Except as permitted by the copyright law applicable to you, you may not reproduce or communicate any of the content on this website, including any photographs and files down-loadable from this website, without the permission of the copyright owner.

The Australian Copyright Act allows certain uses of content on the internet without the copyright owner’s permission. This includes uses by educational institutions for educational purposes, and by Commonwealth and State government departments for government purposes, provided fair payment is made. For more information, see www.copyright.com.au and www.copyright.org.au.

We may change these terms of use from time to time. Check before re-using any content from this website.

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How Do I Start Making Money as a Photographer?

following passion
Some guys and gals jus’ sittin’ around, following their passion

It happens at least once a week.

“I have been a photographer for a whole year now, and I think it’s time I turned pro. I have over 5000 photos on my hard drive: how do I start to make money from them?”

And then, wait for it…the ego driven amateur forever declaration: “I think most of them are really awesome!”

And no sooner is it posted somewhere on the internet, than the mug advice starts to flow, the majority of which falls into one camp or another:

From the utterly useless –

“Don’t take any notice of what anybody tells you, just follow your passion!”

To the completely ridiculous –

“Just keep taking as many photos as you can, of everything you see, and then before you know it, they will start selling!”

Well what kind of advice can you actually give apart from the bleedin’ obvious? Forget ideas of becoming a professional until you learn how to take a decent photograph, and then move on to learning how to take a saleable photograph, and keep practicing until you can do it time and time again, until at least six out of every ten photographs you take are potentially saleable?

OK, although it is completely arse about, and so amateur, rather than how a professional thinks, you could meticulously go through your five thousand photos, and pick the best to lodge with micro stock agencies. Experience says that after only one year as “a photographer”, out of 5000 pics, you will be lucky to find 50 which are in anyway good enough to be saleable, let alone “awesome”.

But fess up! Did you discard all of the over saturated sunsets, the pretty flowers, the snaps of little sis with her face smeared with chocolate at her birthday party, the long exposure water enveloped rocks, and the majority of featureless landscapes?

But go ahead and submit a couple of hundred of your best pics to not one, but a whole slew of micro stock agencies, or picture libraries as the more up market versions prefer to call themselves.

And you can bet London to a brick, that the 50 or so the agencies don’t reject, will be an entirely different 50 to the ones you favour.

You may sell a few in the first few months, but don’t put a deposit on the Ferrari just yet, or even on that luxury skateboard.

Statistics which are not so difficult to find if you know how to search for them, consistently show that photographers who have at least 10,000 , preferably more pictures lodged with libraries, can safely assume that for each of those, you may possibly earn $1 per year on average.

So 10,000 pics = $10,000 per annum earnings?…eee-z-eee murneeee!!!

Reality check! Any fewer, especially only a couple of hundred pictures on file as stock and you will may be just fortunate enough to sell one or a couple, maybe even a few, per year.

Well either way, hardly enough to pay the rent? But remember your cut (your royalty or commission) will only be roughly 0.22c in the dollar at today’s rates if you are in someway charmed….feeling like a professional yet?

So now that you have had at least a little dose of reality: did you actually have a look around those sites when you lodged your photos, to get a feel for the type of photo, the subject matter, the setting, the lighting, the colour schemes that they not only prefer, but the ones which are actually selling?
If not go back not only now, but several times a week and study what is actually in front of your eyes, and which so many look at, but few ever see.

In other words stop relying on luck, your “passion”, and your own perceived artistic genius, and start studying the market!

This is one of the main differences between a raw amateur, and a successful professional. While a mug will take photographs willy-nilly, to suit themselves,or on a whim, of subjects which interest them, in styles of setting, lighting, colour and composition which they consider being an artist with a camera, and then trying to find someone who will think highly enough of your artistic vision to shell out some money for them, this is a really sure fire way of wasting time and energy, and becoming penniless very quickly.

A professional on the other hand survives and thrives on the knowledge that he consistently supplies exactly what his chosen market wants and needs….no more and no less.

He studies each of his target markets, be they picture libraries, magazines, or individual clients for what the want, what they have accepted in the past, what they are looking for in the present.

He knows for instance that magazines of all persuasions do not want art, they do not want “I can do better than that”, they do not want cutting edge, or “out there”: but what they do want is more of exactly the same as they have been publishing for at least the last 12 months, and usually longer.

He also knows that his bride and groom for next weekend’s wedding, do not want anything different to the bride’s BFF’s wedding pictures from last June, tempered of course with what the bride’s parents want: nice pictures of their daughter, and all the guests in their best frocks and suits, and make sure Aunty Dorrie’s wart doesn’t dominate the picture too much.

This is possibly why wedding pictures are still plagued with lopsided horizons which came into accepted fashion in the 1980’s and are still far too evident, een amongst those who should know better, and why after five long years, wedding parties are still required to do the Toyota Leap in unison for that “special unique (?) image”.

So at least begin to think like the professional you aspire to be: study your market till it is second nature and then emulate it in every sense, especially technical aspects such as lighting, depth of field, lens choice, subject, colour use and composition. Once you have done that, and can do it, as stated earlier , at least 6 in every 10 “captures”, you can then start anticipating the trends, and changes as they happen, and more importantly establish your own style.

Then and only then: when, editors, picture curators or selectors, and clients say confidently: “that image is exactly what I was looking for, and I can tell you exactly who took that picture as well”, can you begin to consider yourself an established professional.

 

©Copyright: Stephen Bennett, MMXV
Except as permitted by the copyright law applicable to you, you may not reproduce or communicate any of the content on this website, including any photographs and files downloadable from this website, without the permission of the copyright owner.
The Australian Copyright Act allows certain uses of content on the internet without the copyright owner’s permission. This includes uses by educational institutions for educational purposes, and by Commonwealth and State government departments for government purposes, provided fair payment is made. For more information, see www.copyright.com.au and www.copyright.org.au.
We may change these terms of use from time to time. Check before re-using any content from this website.

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LONG TERM NEED SOON TO BE FILLED

What would you rather hear from your local photographic studio owner/photography instructor?
“I got my first camera at Christmas, and I’ve been a professional photographer ever since”…
or…
“I’ve been a photographer for thirty + years and I still look forward to doing something new each day” 11745747_1442006566125141_8697778603834467661_n

A new photographic studio for hire is about to open in the Newcastle region, in the Lake Macquarie suburb of Cardiff, owned by the very experienced photographer and long time photography instructor, Les Farnham, and ably assisted by the equally experienced Barry Madden.

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Entering the studio complex via the double glass doors takes you into the roomy, and well appointed seminar/classroom, where Farnham’s brainchild the Newcastle Photography School holds its very comprehensive classes. For full details of the classes currently available, and those coming up go to: http://www.newcastlephotographyschool.com.au/

or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NewcastlePhotographySchool?fref=ts

Adjacent to the classroom is Studio One, a very large shooting area with a selection of backdrops, (black, white, deep red, and a green screen). This area is also accessible by a large roller door, allowing cars, boats, and large props to be photographed under studio conditions.

The side walls of this studio also show a gallery of studio prints, and will be available as a gallery showroom for graduate student work on completion of the various courses.

This studio also has very high ceilings, with four individually dim-able work-lights to accommodate different photographers studio comfort levels without interfering with exposures from the photo-flash lighting.

Diagonally from studio one and behind the classroom is Studio Two, a smaller area devoted more to portrait work, passport type photography and more one to one style work.

Tucked into the corner between the two studios is a surprisingly large area for changing, preparation and make-up. Unlike many contemporary studios the comfort of the model is not merely an afterthought here, and features good clean toilet facilities, a private change room, and space for sitting and regrouping between shots. There is also a large area which is set aside for storage and changing of clothing…(clothes racks are being installed probably as I write his) and the addition of a make-up table with a large illuminated make-up mirror will delight models, make-up artists, and stylists alike.

Immediately behind the seminar room is a staircase leading to the mezzanine Studio Three, which is dedicated to macro and product photography, and is complete with a quality product table ready to shoot. This area has all the necessary studio lighting as well as a large window for natural light, allowing for more intimate, natural light portraiture as well, but Les informed me quite rightly that this only really works well during the daytime.

The mezzanine level also features a wall which can be opened up its full length to allow overhead shooting into Studio One, so no doubt many a model will be shot, reclining sensuously not only on the carpeted floor, but on thick shag rugs.

Eventually however, Studio One will be equipped with a heavy duty, moveable and granny proof overhead platform for such shots, which will add further to the versatility of the complex.

This studio complex when it opens in a few weeks time…the photography classes have been running for several weeks already, and the studios should be fully operational as soon as extra lighting equipment and backdrops on order arrive from overseas…will fill a large need by the region’s photographers for a large, well equipped, professional studio owned and run by very experienced, knowledgeable and helpful photographers who are dedicated to the improvement and development of good photography in the area.

I myself plan on using this studio as often as I can as there are no similar studios offering quite the same experience at the moment, and although it is an hour or so drive for me, the friendliness and the open sharing of knowledge gained through extensive experience by both Les and Barry alone are well worth the trip.

No doubt this studio complex will see its fair share of the candy skull and zombie brigade, but it also has the facilities and knowledge base for much more serious and professional work.

Hire of the studio is envisaged as $60 for three hour shoot.

http://www.newcastlephotographyschool.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NewcastlePhotographySchool?fref=ts

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Interesting Links:
My Photography Webpage
Facebook page for Professional Photographers and Models
The Definite Article Photography and Video on Facebook
My Pond 5 Page
The Definite Article at Publicise Me